Description of this paper

Loading

Math 221 Discrete Mathematics UOPX I need full Last 3 weeks of-(Answered)

Description

Step-by-step Instant Solution


Question

I have attached my Discrete Math syllabus for week 3 , week 4 and week 5 I need help on Class Participation, week 5 individual Assignments and week 4 and week 5 Student Connect express Solutions, ASAP Please take a look its very small work not much.?

Book Name: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications ,Seventh Edition by Kenneth Rosen

?instructor name: stephen wiitala for University of Phoenix


Math 221 Discrete Mathematics UOPX

 

I need full Last 3 weeks of help all are listed

 

below

 

Make sure all of them are fresh work with

 

proper citation APA format, no used work

 

will be accepted thanks so much.

 

To be substantive, in addition to meeting the minimum content expectations, your posts

 

must include proper APA style citations at the point of use of information from a source. A

 

citation is a notation of the form (AuthorLastName, date, page). A page reference is

 

required if the information is a direct quote. Citations are required even if the information

 

is not directly quoted, but rather paraprased or summarized. You are also required to

 

provide references formatted in APA style.

 

Make sure while you write any of those answer please use it proper citations as you can see

 

above red lines from my instructor he is very restrict about citations, I request you to read

 

that and follow his instructions thanks so much.

 


 

Week3 Algorithmic Concepts

 

Class Discussions: 4 questions

 

Question 1:

 

Big O notation - a specific example

 

Suppose we are given the following program segment:

 

F(x) = 0

 

Input n

 

For x = 1 to x = n

 

F(x) = x(x+3)+2

 

Print x

 

Next x

 

1. Determine the number of steps the program will execute before entering the loop.

 

2. Determine the number of steps the program will execute each time it passes through the loop.

 


 

3. Determine the total number of steps that will be executed by the program if the value of n is 3,4,5,

 

n

 

4. This program segment is considered to be O(n). Explain why.

 

5. Suppose that another program segment is O(n?). Does this mean that the second segment will

 

always require more steps than this segment?

 


 

Question 2:

 


 

Explaining Induction

 

Many people when first ecountering induction find it very confusing, because it appears that one of

 

the steps in proving a statement by induction is to assume that the statement we are trying to prove

 

is true.

 

Suppose you are discussing this concept with a friend, and you friend tell you that induction does not

 

prove anything. How would you explain to this person why it is that induction actually does work. In

 

my follow up responses to you, I may ask you questions that your friend might as in response to your

 

explanation. Try to phrase those responses as though you were responding to somebody who was

 

very confused.

 


 

Question 3:

 


 

Recursion and Repetition

 

Here are two functions that both compute the same quantity. One is a recursively defined function

 

and the other is defined by repetition.

 

Function A(n)

 

Sum : = 0

 

For x := 1 to n do

 

Sum:= Sum + x

 

end do

 

A(n) := sum

 

end Function A(n)

 

Function B(n)

 

If n = 0 then B(n) : = 0

 

If n > 0 then B(n) := n + B(n-1)

 

end Function B(n)

 

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 


 

What do these two functions compute?

 

Which function is recursive and which function is repetive?

 

Which one do you find easiest to follow

 

What are the differences in the implementation of each function?

 


 

Individual Assignment will be posted once it available from instructor and it?s the lab student connect

 

I have to wait for him to get the information so please wait for that we might can work on this

 

assignment together via TeamViewer.

 


 

Week4 Graph Theory and Trees

 

Class Discussions:- 2 questions

 

Question 1:

 


 

An Application of Graph Theory in Network Design

 

Suppose that we have a communication network with 5 nodes, and each pair of nodes is connected

 

directly. This network can be represented by a graph with 5 vertices {A,B,C,D,E}, and 10 edges

 

{AB,AC,AD,AE,BC,BD,BE,CD,CE, DE}.

 

Assume the the network has been hit with a disaster in such a a way that each link has a 50%

 

probability that the link is intact. Simulate that situation by flipping a coin 10 times, once for each

 

edge. If the coin is heads, the link has remaind intact. If the coin is tails, the link has been lost.

 

1. Draw the resulting graph

 

2. How many edges does the resulting graph have?

 

3. Is the graph that results connected? What does this mean for the ability to continue to

 

communicate through the network?

 

4. Do you think that if a 6th node were added to the network but we were limited to having only 10

 

edges if the situation would change? How would you arrange the edges make it as likely as possible

 

that the network would remain connected?

 

This is actually a discussion related to an interesting topic in graph theory known as random graphs.

 

This theory can explore the chances that various network configurations remain intact based on

 

various probabilities of failures of links in the network (we might change the probability of a failure

 

from 50% to some other value).

 


 

Question 2:

 


 

Trees and Computations

 

Trees occur in various venues in computer science: decision trees in algorithms, search trees, and

 

so on. One important kind of trees computer languages is the parse tree. It is used to break down

 

statements in a programming langue into a form that can be converted into machine code. The most

 

familiar of these kinds of trees are used to break down Arithmetic statements into trees.

 

For example, the computation 2*3 + 4, can be parsed into the following tree

 

+

 

/

 

\

 


 

*

 

/

 

2

 


 

4

 

\

 

3

 


 

On the other hand the computation 2 * (3 + 4) would have a different parse tree

 

*

 

/ \

 

2

 

+

 

/ \

 

3 4

 

1. What are the similarities differences between the two trees in terms of depth, roots, and breadth?

 

2. What do those differences between the trees tell us about the differences between the steps need

 

to do each computation.

 

3. Provide an arithmetic computation with at least three operations in it, and determine its parse

 

tree.

 


 

Individual Assignment will be posted once it available from instructor and it?s the lab student connect

 

I have to wait for him to get the information so please wait for that we might can work on this

 

assignment together via TeamViewer.

 

Please don?t forget to help me on this week Individual assignment

 


 

Week5 Applications of Discrete Mathematics

 

Class Discussions:- 4 questions

 

Question 1:

 


 

Solutions to Practice Problem 1

 


 

Practice Problem (1) on Counting Techniques

 

There are four practice problems available for you to discuss this week. They focus on content from

 

all four of the previous week of the course. Use these problems to test your readiness for the Final

 

Exam. Towards the end of the the week, I will post solutions to the problems. Your responses in this

 

discussion do count for participation credit

 

Suppose you are organizing a business meeting and are in charge of facilitating the introductions.

 


 

A. Suppose there are 5 people in the group

 

1.How would you arrange the group so each person can shake hands with every other person?

 


 

2. How many times will each person shake hands with someone else?

 

3. How many handshakes will occur?

 


 

B. Suppose there is an unknown number (n) people in the group

 

1.How would you arrange the group of n people so each person can shake hands with every other

 

person?

 

2. How many times will each person shake hands with someone else?

 

3. How many handshakes will occur? This answer should be expressed as a general counting

 

formula that depends on the value of n.

 


 

Question 2:

 


 

Solutions to Practice Problem 2

 


 

Practice Problem (2) on Logic

 

There are four practice problems available for you to discuss this week. They focus on content from

 

all four of the previous week of the course. Use these problems to test your readiness for the Final

 

Exam. Towards the end of the week, I will post solutions to the problems. Your responses in this

 

discussion do count for participation credit

 

Use a truth table or Venn diagram to show that the statement p v (q ^ r) is equivalent to (p v q) ^ (p v

 

r)

 

Show that this statement is not equivalent to (p v q) ^ r.

 


 

Be sure to explain your answer and don't just provide a truth table or Venn diagram. Why does your

 

table or diagram verify the result?

 


 

Question 3:-

 


 

Solutions to Practice Problem 3

 


 

Practice Problem (3) on Relations

 

There are four practice problems available for you to discuss this week. They focus on content from

 

all four of the previous week of the course. Use these problems to test your readiness for the Final

 

Exam. Towards the end of the week, I will post solutions to the problems. Your responses in this

 

discussion do count for participation credit

 


 

Define the following relation on the set of positive integers

 


 

xRy if x - y is an even integer

 


 

1. Show that R is an equivalence relation.

 

With an equivalence relation, the set on which the relation is defined is divided into subsets called

 

equivalence classes. These subsets consist of all elements that are equivalent to each other. The

 

equivalence class of 1, denoted by [1] consists of all elements that are equivalent to 1 under the

 

relation.

 


 

2. How many distinct equivalence classes are there in this example? Can you describe the sets?

 


 

Question 4:-

 


 

Solutions to Practice Problem 4

 


 

Practice Problem (4) on Tree Traversal Algorithms

 

There are four practice problems available for you to discuss this week. They focus on content from

 

all four of the previous week osf the course. Use these problems to test your readiness for the Final

 

Exam.. Your responses in this discussion do count for participation credit

 

The following algorithm describes a postorder tree traversal

 

Postorder(tree)

 

If left subtree exists then Postorder(left subtree)

 

If right subtree exists then Postorder(right subtree)

 

Print root

 

end

 


 

Can you apply that to the following tree

 


 

+

 

/

 


 

\

 


 

/

 


 

\

 


 

*

 


 

-

 


 

/ \

 


 

/

 


 

\

 


 

2 3

 


 

*

 


 

+

 


 

/ \

 


 

/ \

 


 

4 2 1 5

 


 

What is the result of the executing the algorithm? In the terminology of Week 3, what kind of

 

algorithm are we considering here?

 


 

Individual Assignment:-

 


 

Case Study Application Paper

 

Choose one of the following Case Studies:

 


 


 

Food Webs

 


 


 


 

Coding Theory

 


 


 


 

Network Flows

 


 

Write a 750- to 1,250-word paper in which you complete one of the following options:

 


 

Option 1: Food Webs Case Study

 

Explain the theory in your own words based on the case study and suggested readings.

 

Include the following in your explanation:

 


 


 

Competition

 


 


 


 

Food Webs

 


 


 


 

Boxicity

 


 


 


 

Trophic Status

 


 

Give an example of how this could be applied in other real-world applications.

 

Format your paper according to APA guidelines. All work must be properly cited and referenced. The

 

correct reference for this source is the following:

 


 

McGuigan, R. A.. (1991). Food Webs. Retrieved from McGuigan, R. A., MTH221 - Discrete

 

Math for Information Technology website

 


 

Submit your assignment to the Assignment Files tab.

 


 

Option 2: Coding Theory Case Study

 

Explain the theory in your own words based on the case study and suggested readings.

 

Include the following in your explanation:

 


 


 

Error Detecting Codes

 


 


 


 

Error Correcting Codes

 


 


 


 

Hamming Distance

 


 


 


 

Perfect Codes

 


 


 


 

Generator Matrices

 


 


 


 

Parity Check Matrices

 


 


 


 

Hamming Codes

 


 

Give an example of how this could be applied in other real-world applications.

 

Format your paper according to APA guidelines. All work must be properly cited and referenced. The

 

correct reference for this source is

 


 

Rosen, K. H.. (1991). Coding Theory . Retrieved from Rosen, K. H., MTH221 - Discrete

 


 

Math for Information Technology website.

 


 

Submit your assignment to the Assignment Files tab.

 


 

Option 3: Network Flows Case Study

 

Explain the solutions for examples 1, 2 and 3 from the text.

 

Explain the theory developed including capacitated s,t graphs and the lexicographic ordering rule

 

based on the case study and suggested readings.

 

Give an example of how this could be applied in other real-world applications.

 

Format your paper according to APA guidelines. All work must be properly cited and referenced.

 

The correct reference for this source is:

 


 

Hobbs, A. M. (1991). Network Flows. Retrieved from Rosen, K. H., MTH221 - Discrete Math for

 

Information Technology website.

 

Attached PDF file has all three documents for the week 5 case study application paper

 


 

Supporting documents?

 


 

Week -5 Food Webs

 

Week 5 Mt

 

Week -5 Mth

 

theory.pdf

 

h221_r3_coding_theory_case_study.pdf

 

221_r3_network_flows_case_study.pdf

 


 

There are 2 individual assignments on week 5, I only have one information so far and that is above listed

 

and waiting for the other one.

 

He is using this book Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications 7e

 

Kenneth H. ROSEN

 


 

 

Paper#9256343 | Written in 27-Jul-2016

Price : $16
SiteLock